Delivering alcohol IBA in non-health settings?

29 Sep

IBA questionsIn this guest post Dr Fizz Annand takes a quick look at recent research she was involved in exploring alcohol brief intervention as ‘IBA’ in non-health settings.

A team of researchers from the Drug and Alcohol Research Centre based at Middlesex University have completed a literature review as part of a larger research project funded by an Alcohol Research UK grant. A short ‘insight report’ of the research can be found here.

The evidence base for the effectiveness of IBA in health settings particularly primary care and to a smaller extent A&E, is well documented and because of the proven effectiveness in these settings there is a push to extend the delivery of alcohol IBA into other, non-health settings. This is despite there not being anywhere near the same weight of evidence to do so.

Some studies in schools, criminal justice, pharmacies and universities have shown promise in terms of the feasibility of IBA delivery, however in order to deliver, staff in these settings have needed extra support in order to be able to embed it into their everyday practice. Some studies on computerised or web-based versions if IBA show potential with students or people not in touch with services but more evidence is needed.

In most other settings evidence is weak or non-existent. The workplace has been proposed as an obvious context where benefits could be felt by both workers and employers given the impact of alcohol on productivity. Occupational Health teams could provide a structure in which IBA could be delivered as part of wider health screening and support. In order to convince employers of the benefit a business case would have to be demonstrated.

The researchers highlight the potential for financial rewards to operate as incentives to implementation however it is unclear how much the incentives should be.

A number of barriers to implementation were documented in the studies which included:

  • Lack of buy-in from organisations
  • Staff not feeling it’s their job, or that they have sufficient skills
  • Workload pressure
  • Reluctance to engage on part of staff and/or clients and concerns about confidentiality

Whilst IBA training was rolled out in many organisations, this alone did not necessarily result in widespread implementation of IBA. Very little monitoring or evaluation of the implementation was undertaken.

The researchers concluded that there’s good reason to feel optimistic that IBA in non-health settings can be delivered. Thought does however need to be given to how to adapt the implementation to take account of organisational, professional and context- specific issues that hamper implementation and, in particular, the sustainability of initiatives in the long term. Financial incentives may generate interest in delivery, and monitoring/evaluation will allow measurement of implementation, activity and ultimately help to justify the use of resources.

A full version of the report ‘Delivering Alcohol IBA Broadening the base from health to non-health contexts: Review of the literature and scoping’ can be found here.

Follow Fizz on Twitter @FizzAnnand or see here for contacts.

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One Response to “Delivering alcohol IBA in non-health settings?”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Delivering Alcohol IBA | Alcohol Horizon Scanning - October 24, 2014

    […] Some important notes: A summary can be accessed here and a blog can be accessed here. […]

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