Archive | September, 2016

95% people are ‘comfortable’ talking to GPs about alcohol

30 Sep

iba-gpResults from the 2015 British Social Attitudes (BSA) were recently released, revealing the vast majority of patients felt either fairly (20%) or very comfortable (75%) talking to their doctor about their alcohol consumption.

Just 2% of respondents were either fairly or very uncomfortable doing so, suggesting there is little justification for the commonly perceived barrier that patients may be defensive when offered brief intervention. A further 3% said they did not feel either comfortable or not.

Furthermore over four-fifths (85%) of people say that they “would answer completely honestly”, while 14% say that they would “bend the truth a little”. Whilst the study found people were more likely so say they would answer honestly if they didn’t drink or were lower risk drinkers, 62% of risky drinkers still said they would be truthfull.

This may in part be because many at-risk drinkers are not aware of their drinking as such, but still the results suggest a widespread public acceptance of the role of IBA in health care settings. Unfortunately, despite ongoing efforts to incentivise and support Primary Care roles to deliver IBA, less than 10% of at-risk drinkers report recieving alcohol advice, compared to over 50% of smokers.

‘How’ you ask is important too

Despite such a high percentage of patients being comfortable to discuss their alcohol use, it is important to note that how such questions – and any subsequent ‘advice’ – is carried out is crucial to the effectiveness of brief intervention.

One of the most important things is to ensure patients do not feel they are being judged or picked out individually for alcohol questions. Whilst many practices screen patients at certain points, initiating IBA can be done whenever a spare moment arises.

raising-the-subject

Patients of course do have the right to decline, and any following conversation should not be pushy or lecturing. Delivering a validated alcohol assessment such as the AUDIT and offering brief feedback on the person’s score appear to be the most important elements – Primary Care roles musn’t think that patients are against this.

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