Tag Archives: brief interventions

The Evidence of Effectiveness & Minimum Standards for IBA in Community Health Settings

31 Mar

A new document outlining the evidence for IBA and standards for delivery in a range of settings has been released. Commissioned by the Safe Sociable London Partnership, the document provides an overview of the evidence base for IBA as a short ‘brief intervention’, and suggests how it should be delivered in key community health settings.IBA evidence and standards_community health

The Evidence of Effectiveness & Minimum Standards for the Provision of Alcohol Identification and Brief Advice in Community Health Settings [pdf]

‘Identification and Brief Advice’ has been central to England’s alcohol policy, particularly given its effectiveness in comparison to other individual level interventions. Brief intervention is most likely to ‘work’ because a combination of ‘identifying’ a level of risk – and ‘feedback’ to the drinker to inform them of this – may trigger a process of change.

In contrast, just handing someone a booklet means even if it is read, a risky drinker may not realise the information is relevant to them and assume they are fine. Brief advice may also give added benefits, such as helping build a person’s motivation or belief in their ability to change.

As such, the guides summarises the evidence base behind IBA, for example it states:

“On average, following intervention, individuals reduced their drinking by 15%. While this may not be enough to bring the individual’s drinking down to lower risk levels, it will reduce their alcohol-related hospital admissions by 20% and “absolute risk of lifetime alcohol-related death by some 20%” as well as have a significant impact on alcohol–related morbidity.”

As well as setting out an interpretation of how IBA should be delivered, it provides specific suggestions and statements for key community health roles including:nurse IBA

  • Primary Care Staff
  • Community Pharmacists
  • Midwives and Health Visitors
  • Mental Health Service Staff
  • Drug Service Staff
  • Delivery by Sexual Health Workers

The report also addresses the crucial issue of ‘making it happen’ through what it describes as ensuring ‘organisational ownership’, as well as the need for training, materials and inter-linking IBA with related issues and policy.

Some of the statements within the report will still be subject to debate. In particular, exactly what ‘brief advice’ consists of, and whether IBA should be implemented in all community health settings without more setting specific evidence.

Exactly what ‘IBA’ is as a form of brief intervention has been explored in the ‘Clarifying brief interventions’ briefing [pdf], and IBA in non-health settings has been explored in recent research report.

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#UKalcohol – Twitter discussion on IBA/brief interventions

30 Jul

A planned Twitter discussion on addressing alcohol harms will take place on Wednesday the 13th August at 8pm (= 20.00 BST = 19.00 GMT = 3pm/15.00 EDT) on the theme of alcohol brief advice and brief interventions.  This follows on from an initial discussion on alcohol-related hospital admissions which you can read here.

Who can take part?

The aim of the #UKalcohol discussions is to identify and discuss key issues facing those working in the alcohol field – either as commissioners, researchers, service providers or policy roles. It is hoped a different ‘theme’ will be addressed each month, reflecting key areas of interest.

#UKalcohol discussion 13th August: alcohol brief advice, brief interventions

The 2nd planned discussion is intended to cover the broad theme of design, delivery, support and monitoring of alcohol brief advice in addressing alcohol-related risks and harm.

The following issues may be used as needed as prompts/themes for discussion:

  1. What is brief advice, what is a brief intervention, does it matter?
  2. How widely should we implement brief advice/interventions on the basis of current evidence?
  3. What is needed to support brief advice/interventions in practice? How do the needs of different settings differ?
  4. How should brief advice/interventions on alcohol fit with attempts to address other lifestyle issues?
  5. What monitoring and evaluation of these interventions is needed and is it feasible?

Partnership

This 2nd discussion is being brought to you by the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies with the support from a range of partners and stakeholders who will be jointly supporting the alcohol Twitter discussion, and may initiate further themed discussions in future.

Next steps

If you are interested in participating in the proposed Twitter discussion either as an individual or on behalf of your organisation simply sign in via Twitter on Wednesday the 13th August at 8pm and use the #UKalcohol. Discussion may be subsequently captured and shared via Storify.  You can also follow @ukctas to see tweets about this in advance.

If you’d like to ask any questions or help with Twitter please do get in touch via niamh.fitzgerald@stir.ac.uk or james@alcoholacademy.net.