Tag Archives: IBA direct

‘IBA direct’ evaluation shows people welcome IBA in public

21 Dec

An evaluation has shown that taking ‘IBA direct’ to people on the streets of South London was found to be highly effective in engaging people and delivering brief intervention.

The project, branded ‘The London Challenge: are you healthier than your mates?’, took place over three days in August and tested a number of methods to engage passersby and deliver IBA.

Resonant, a specialist behaviour change agency, had been commissioned by NHS Lambeth to deliver the activity in a way which would engage at-risk drinkers in their 20’s as an identified target group. Within the borough, this age range were found to be less likely to access services where they might receive IBA, but many were found to be drinking at risky levels.

As part of the ‘The London Challenge’, four ‘brand ambassadors’ were trained to engage passersby and offer IBA. Free ‘mocktails’ were offered as an incentive to ‘hook’ the public into completing the AUDIT.

Resonant developed the approach based on research and ‘co-creation’ with the target group who identified that answering alcohol questions and receiving ‘brief advice’ was acceptable as long as it was engaging and non-judgemental.

The evaluation was independently conducted by the South London Health Innovation Network (HIN) Alcohol team.

Rod Watson, Senior Project Manager (Alcohol) for the Health Innovation Network highlights some key observations on the evaluation findings:

  • The service evaluation found IBA Direct is feasible and acceptable at being delivered in a public setting by non-health professionals.
  • Over the course of the three days of the project, 402 people received IBA.
  • The brand ambassadors engaged people with professionalism and their approach was central to the large number of people taking part.
  • A small follow up sample of the 402 people who received IBA direct showed a reduction in AUDIT scores six weeks following the intervention. (Note: caution should be exercised here as no control group was used).
  • A participant feedback form was completed by 61 people. Participants rated both the ‘London Challenge’ and the service they received from a brand ambassador highly.
  • All respondents found the setting to be suitable and 90% stated they would take part in this service in a public setting again. There was nothing reported back that indicated any concerns from people about the public setting of the project.

As such the project shows significant potential for delivering IBA ‘direct’ to people in public spaces. Given the challenges facing IBA in other settings, this approach could offer a promising channel to reach new groups of at-risk drinkers.

The full report can be downloaded here:

‘The London Challenge: are you healthier than your mates?’ Service Evaluation of Alcohol Identification and Brief Advice Direct to the Public [pdf]

To find out more about IBA direct please get in touch.

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‘IBA Direct’ – new opportunities for brief intervention?

20 May

IBA directIn London a piece of work has been underway seeking to design and deliver interventions to ‘at-risk’ drinkers who are unlikely to come into contact with a health care professional. Young ‘twenty-somethings’ are less likely to visit their GP, but more likely to drink heavily when they do drink. So how else can these drinkers be reached?

We know ‘responsible drinking’ messages alone are unlikely to be effective, particularly when we consider the environment and all those alcohol cues. We also know IBA is effective, particularly in Primary Care, but serious questions remain over actual delivery, even for the minority that do receive it. But what about cutting out the middle man and taking IBA straight to the target group?

This was the idea behind ‘IBA direct’. Resonant, an agency who specialise in behaviour change, went out and found local twenty-somethings drinking at risky levels and worked with them to co-create how they could be reached in an effective way. Young risky drinkers said they were more than happy, in fact actually liked doing the ‘alcohol quiz’ – i.e the AUDIT. They found it interesting and it made them think, especially when they knew it was credible rather than just a magazine style quiz.  Perhaps surprisingly they actually liked a person offering them ‘feedback’ and ‘advice’, rather than a less personalised web approach.

The real challenge is how to reach significant numbers of these drinkers with ‘IBA direct’, and whether it can be done cost-effectively. The drinkers themselves identified that it needed to be engaging, part of something that would grab their attention and hook them in. As you would also expect, it also need to avoid being presented as something that would make them feel judged or lectured.

chuggerPerhaps one way of delivering ‘IBA direct’ can akin to ‘chugging’ – aka those ‘charity muggers’, except not going after anyone’s money. In fact they are offering a person something that might them make a healthier, informed choice about something they didn’t realise carried so many risks (or benefits from cutting down). Perhaps there are many opportunities where we can engage the public directly through IBA, rather than relying on busy practitioners.

In some ways ‘IBA direct’ is also not entirely new. If you’ve invited someone to do IBA at a community event, for instance during Alcohol Awareness Week, that’s IBA direct. Apps or web-based approaches could also be argued to be, but IBA in its true form is delivered by a person. The question is, how cost-effective is it going to be, and what’s the best way to really hook people in? Work is under-way to test this out, so watch this space!

IBA direct summary

You can read more about Resonant’s work with Lambeth 20-somethings via IBA direct (pdf) or get in touch here.